TESS DEI DURBERVILLES PDF

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family of the d'Urbervilles, who derive their descent from .. Why, Tess Durbeyfield, if there isn't a farmer in his spring cart, driving approximately in the di-. Download our free ePUB, PDF or MOBI eBooks to read on almost any device — your desktop, iPhone, Tess of the d'Urbervilles Get your free eBook now!. Free site book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Tess of the d'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman by Thomas Hardy. No cover available.


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about · read · complete · download · ePub · site. Tess of the d'Urbervilles A Pure Woman. Thomas Hardy. This web edition published by [email protected] The Project Gutenberg eBook, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy This I was born bad, and I have lived bad, and I shall die bad in all probability. Tess of the d'Urbervilles - Thomas smeltitherabpigs.tk - Ebook download as PDF File Her darling was about to die. and had dutifully studied the histories of Aholah and .

She felt a little as she had used to feel when she sat by her now wedded husband in the same spot during his wooing, shutting her eyes to his defects of character, and regarding him only in his ideal presentation as lover. Tess, being left alone with the younger children, went first to the outhouse with the fortune-telling book, and stuffed it into the thatch.

A curious fetishistic fear of this grimy volume on the part of her mother prevented her ever allowing it to stay in the house all night, and hither it was brought back whenever it had been consulted. Between the mother, with her fast-perishing lumber of superstitions, folk-lore, dialect, and orally transmitted ballads, and the daughter, with her trained National teachings and Standard knowledge under an infinitely Revised Code, there was a gap of two hundred years as ordinarily understood.

When they were together the Jacobean and the Victorian ages were juxtaposed. Returning along the garden path Tess mused on what the mother could have wished to ascertain from the book on this particular day. She guessed the recent ancestral discovery to bear upon it, but did not divine that it solely concerned herself.

Dismissing this, however, she busied herself with sprinkling the linen dried during the day-time, in company with her nine-year-old brother Abraham, and her sister Eliza-Louisa of twelve and a half, called "'Liza-Lu," the youngest ones being put to bed. There was an interval of four years and more between Tess and the next of the family, the two who had filled the gap having died in their infancy, and this lent her a deputy-maternal attitude when she was alone with her juniors.

Next in juvenility to Abraham came two more girls, Hope and Modesty; then a boy of three, and then the baby, who had just completed his first year. All these young souls were passengers in the Durbeyfield shipentirely dependent on the judgement of the two Durbeyfield adults for their pleasures, their necessities, their health, even their existence.

If the heads of the Durbeyfield household chose to sail into difficulty, disaster, starvation, disease, degradation, death, thither were these half-dozen little captives under hatches compelled to sail with themsix helpless creatures, who had never been asked if they wished for life on any terms, much less if they wished for it on such hard conditions as were involved in being of the shiftless house of Durbeyfield.

Some people would like to know whence the poet whose philosophy is in these days deemed as profound and trustworthy as his song is breezy and pure, gets his authority for speaking of "Nature's holy plan. Tess looked out of the door, and took a mental journey through Marlott. The village was shutting its eyes. Candles and lamps were being put out everywhere: she could inwardly behold the extinguisher and the extended hand.

Her mother's fetching simply meant one more to fetch. Tess began to perceive that a man in indifferent health, who proposed to start on a journey before one in the morning, ought not to be at an inn at this late hour celebrating his ancient blood. Half an hour passed yet again; neither man, woman, nor child returned. Abraham, like his parents, seemed to have been limed and caught by the ensnaring inn.

IV Rolliver's inn, the single alehouse at this end of the long and broken village, could only boast of an off-licence; hence, as nobody could legally drink on the premises, the amount of overt accommodation for consumers was strictly limited to a little board about six inches wide and two yards long, fixed to the garden palings by pieces of wire, so as to form a ledge.

On this board thirsty strangers deposited their cups as they stood in the road and drank, and threw the dregs on the dusty ground to the pattern of Polynesia, and wished they could have a restful seat inside. Thus the strangers. But there were also local customers who felt the same wish; and where there's a will there's a way.

In a large bedroom upstairs, the window of which was thickly curtained with a great woollen shawl lately discarded by the landlady, Mrs Rolliver, were gathered on this evening nearly a dozen persons, all seeking beatitude; all old inhabitants of the nearer end of Marlott, and frequenters of this retreat. Not only did the distance to the The Pure Drop, the fully-licensed tavern at the further part of the dispersed village, render its accommodation practically unavailable for dwellers at this end; but the far more serious question, the quality of the liquor, confirmed the prevalent opinion that it was better to drink with Rolliver in a corner of the housetop than with the other landlord in a wide house.

A gaunt four-post bedstead which stood in the room afforded sitting-space for several persons gathered round three of its sides; a couple more men had elevated themselves on a chest of drawers; another rested on the oak-carved "cwoffer"; two on the wash-stand; another on the stool; and thus all were, somehow, seated at their ease.

The stage of mental comfort to which they had arrived at this hour was one wherein their souls expanded beyond their skins, and spread their personalities warmly through the room. In this process the chamber and its furniture grew more and more dignified and luxurious; the shawl hanging at the window took upon itself the richness of tapestry; the brass handles of the chest of drawers were as golden knockers; and the carved bedposts seemed to have some kinship with the magnificent pillars of Solomon's temple.

Mrs Durbeyfield, having quickly walked hitherward after parting from Tess, opened the front door, crossed the downstairs room, which was in deep gloom, and then unfastened the stair-door like one whose fingers knew the tricks of the latches well. Her ascent of the crooked staircase was a slower process, and her face, as it rose into the light above the last stair, encountered the gaze of all the party assembled in the bedroom.

I thought it might be some gaffer sent by Gover'ment. He was humming absently to himself, in a low tone: "I be as good as some folks here and there! I've got a great family vault at Kingsbere-sub-Greenhill, and finer skillentons than any man in Wessex! Don't 'ee sing so loud, my good man," said the landlady; "in case any member of the Gover'ment should be passing, and take away my licends. D'ye think there's any money hanging by it?

She repeated the information. But she's nothing beside wea junior branch of us, no doubt, hailing long since King Norman's day. I don't see why two branches o' one family should not be on visiting terms. What nonsense be ye talking! Go away, and play on the stairs till father and mother be ready! Well, Tess ought to go to this other member of our family. She'd be sure to win the ladyTess would; and likely enough 'twould lead to some noble gentleman marrying her. In short, I know it. You should ha' seen how pretty she looked to-day; her skin is as sumple as a duchess'.

She don't know there is any such lady-relation yet. But it would certainly put her in the way of a grand marriage, and she won't say nay to going. Leave her to me. The conversation became inclusive, and presently other footsteps were heard crossing the room below. Even to her mother's gaze the girl's young features looked sadly out of place amid the alcoholic vapours which floated here as no unsuitable medium for wrinkled middle-age; and hardly was a reproachful flash from Tess's dark eyes needed to make her father and mother rise from their seats, hastily finish their ale, and descend the stairs behind her, Mrs Rolliver's caution following their footsteps.

He had, in truth, drunk very littlenot a fourth of the quantity which a systematic tippler could carry to church on a Sunday afternoon without a hitch in his eastings or genuflections; but the weakness of Sir John's constitution made mountains of his petty sins in this kind.

On reaching the fresh air he was sufficiently unsteady to incline the row of three at one moment as if they were marching to London, and at another as if they were marching to Bathwhich produced a comical effect, frequent enough in families on nocturnal homegoings; and, like most comical effects, not quite so comic after all.

The two women valiantly disguised these forced excursions and countermarches as well as they could from Durbeyfield, their cause, and from Abraham, and from themselves; and so they approached by degrees their own door, the head of the family bursting suddenly into his former refrain as he drew near, as if to fortify his soul at sight of the smallness of his present residence "I've got a family vault at Kingsbere!

Look at the Anktells, and Horseys, and the Tringhams themselvesgone to seed a'most as much as youthough you was bigger folks than they, that's true.

Thank God, I was never of no family, and have nothing to be ashamed of in that way! From you nater 'tis my belief you've disgraced yourselves more than any o' us, and was kings and queens outright at one time. I shall be all right in an hour or two," said Durbeyfield. It was eleven o'clock before the family were all in bed, and two o'clock next morning was the latest hour for starting with the beehives if they were to be delivered to the retailers in Casterbridge before the Saturday market began, the way thither lying by bad roads over a distance of between twenty and thirty miles, and the horse and waggon being of the slowest.

At half-past one Mrs Durbeyfield came into the large bedroom where Tess and all her little brothers and sisters slept. Tess sat up in bed, lost in a vague interspace between a dream and this information. Swarming will soon be over for the year; and it we put off taking 'em till next week's market the call for 'em will be past, and they'll be thrown on our hands.

One of them who were so much after dancing with 'ee yesterday," she presently suggested. I think I could go if Abraham could go with me to kip me company. Little Abraham was aroused from his deep sleep in a corner of the same apartment, and made to put on his clothes while still mentally in the other world. Meanwhile Tess had hastily dressed herself; and the twain, lighting a lantern, went out to the stable.

The rickety little waggon was already laden, and the girl led out the horse, Prince, only a degree less rickety than the vehicle. The poor creature looked wonderingly round at the night, at the lantern, at their two figures, as if he could not believe that at that hour, when every living thing was intended to be in shelter and at rest, he was called upon to go out and labour.

They put a stock of candle-ends into the lantern, hung the latter to the off-side of the load, and directed the horse onward, walking at his shoulder at first during the uphill parts of the way, in order not to overload an animal of so little vigour. To cheer themselves as well as they could, they made an artificial morning with the lantern, some bread and butter, and their own conversation, the real morning being far from come.

Abraham, as he more fully awoke for he had moved in a sort of trance so far , began to talk of the strange shapes assumed by the various dark objects against the sky; of this tree that looked like a raging tiger springing from a lair; of that which resembled a giant's head.

When they had passed the little town of Stourcastle, dumbly somnolent under its thick brown thatch, they reached higher ground. Still higher, on their left, the elevation called Bulbarrow, or Bealbarrow, well-nigh the highest in South Wessex, swelled into the sky, engirdled by its earthen trenches.

From hereabout the long road was fairly level for some distance onward. They mounted in front of the waggon, and Abraham grew reflective. Our great relation?

We have no such relation. What has put that into your head? There's a rich lady of our family out at Trantridge, and mother said that if you claimed kin with the lady, she'd put 'ee in the way of marrying a gentleman.

Abraham talked on, rather for the pleasure of utterance than for audition, so that his sister's abstraction was of no account. He leant back against the hives, and with upturned face made observations on the stars, whose cold pulses were beating amid the black hollows above, in serene dissociation from these two wisps of human life. He asked how far away those twinklers were, and whether God was on the other side of them. But ever and anon his childish prattle recurred to what impressed his imagination even more deeply than the wonders of creation.

If Tess were made rich by marrying a gentleman, would she have money enough to download a spyglass so large that it would draw the stars as near to her as Nettlecombe-Tout? The renewed subject, which seemed to have impregnated the whole family, filled Tess with impatience. They sometimes seem to be like the apples on our stubbard-tree. Most of them splendid and sounda few blighted.

Tess was not skilful in the management of a horse, but she thought that she could take upon herself the entire conduct of the load for the present and allow Abraham to go to sleep if he wished to do so.

She made him a sort of nest in front of the hives, in such a manner that he could not fall, and, taking the reins into her own hands, jogged on as before. Prince required but slight attention, lacking energy for superfluous movements of any sort. With no longer a companion to distract her, Tess fell more deeply into reverie than ever, her back leaning against the hives.

The mute procession past her shoulders of trees and hedges became attached to fantastic scenes outside reality, and the occasional heave of the wind became the sigh of some immense sad soul, conterminous with the universe in space, and with history in time.

Then, examining the mesh of events in her own life, she seemed to see the vanity of her father's pride; the gentlemanly suitor awaiting herself in her mother's fancy; to see him as a grimacing personage, laughing at her poverty and her shrouded knightly ancestry.

Everything grew more and more extravagant, and she no longer knew how time passed. A sudden jerk shook her in her seat, and Tess awoke from the sleep into which she, too, had fallen.

They were a long way further on than when she had lost consciousness, and the waggon had stopped. A hollow groan, unlike anything she had ever heard in her life, came from the front, followed by a shout of "Hoi there!

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Something terrible had happened. The harness was entangled with an object which blocked the way. In consternation Tess jumped down, and discovered the dreadful truth.

The groan had proceeded from her father's poor horse Prince. The morning mail- cart, with its two noiseless wheels, speeding along these lanes like an arrow, as it always did, had driven into her slow and unlighted equipage. The pointed shaft of the cart had entered the breast of the unhappy Prince like a sword, and from the wound his life's blood was spouting in a stream, and falling with a hiss into the road.

In her despair Tess sprang forward and put her hand upon the hole, with the only result that she became splashed from face to skirt with the crimson drops.

Then she stood helplessly looking on. Prince also stood firm and motionless as long as he could; till he suddenly sank down in a heap.

By this time the mail-cart man had joined her, and began dragging and unharnessing the hot form of Prince. But he was already dead, and, seeing that nothing more could be done immediately, the mail-cart man returned to his own animal, which was uninjured.

I'll send somebody to help you as soon as I can. It is getting daylight, and you have nothing to fear. The atmosphere turned pale, the birds shook themselves in the hedges, arose, and twittered; the lane showed all its white features, and Tess showed hers, still whiter.

The huge pool of blood in front of her was already assuming the iridescence of coagulation; and when the sun rose a hundred prismatic hues were reflected from it. Prince lay alongside, still and stark; his eyes half open, the hole in his chest looking scarcely large enough to have let out all that had animated him.

What will mother and father live on now? Aby, Aby! In silence they waited through an interval which seemed endless. Tess wants to tell Angel about her past, but she can't bring herself reveal it to him. Finally, the night before they're supposed to get married, she slips a note under his door confessing everything. When he doesn't say anything about it the next morning, she assumes all is forgiven—but really, he never saw the note.

On their wedding night, he confesses to her that he'd had a brief fling with a strange woman in London long before he'd met Tess. So Tess feels like she can tell him about Alec, since that wasn't her fault. But Angel doesn't see it that way. He's shocked and horrified that she's not a virgin, and runs off to South America to try and forget about her.

Tess is heart-broken and wanders from job to job, trying to leave her problems behind her. But her problems keep finding her.

Alec runs into her on the road, and even though he's become a Christian, he becomes obsessed with her again. The two women valiantly disguised these forced excursions and countermarches as well as they could from Durbeyfield.

Look at the Anktells. Thank God.

I shall be all right in an hour or two. It was eleven o'clock before the family were all in bed. Swarming will soon be over for the year. At half-past one Mrs Durbeyfield came into the large bedroom where Tess and all her little brothers and sisters slept. From you nater 'tis my belief you've disgraced yourselves more than any o' us. Tess sat up in bed. One of them who were so much after dancing with 'ee yesterday.

When they had passed the little town of Stourcastle. Little Abraham was aroused from his deep sleep in a corner of the same apartment.

The poor creature looked wonderingly round at the night. Meanwhile Tess had hastily dressed herself. The rickety little waggon was already laden.

To cheer themselves as well as they could. They mounted in front of the waggon.

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From hereabout the long road was fairly level for some distance onward. Still higher. I think I could go if Abraham could go with me to kip me company.

They put a stock of candle-ends into the lantern. Our great relation? We have no such relation. The renewed subject. He asked how far away those twinklers were. But ever and anon his childish prattle recurred to what impressed his imagination even more deeply than the wonders of creation. What has put that into your head? Abraham talked on. There's a rich lady of our family out at Trantridge. He leant back against the hives.

If Tess were made rich by marrying a gentleman. Most of them splendid and sound—a few blighted. They sometimes seem to be like the apples on our stubbard-tree. Tess was not skilful in the management of a horse. The mute procession past her shoulders of trees and hedges became attached to fantastic scenes outside reality. The morning mail-. Everything grew more and more extravagant.

The groan had proceeded from her father's poor horse Prince. The harness was entangled with an object which blocked the way. She made him a sort of nest in front of the hives. Prince required but slight attention. In consternation Tess jumped down. A hollow groan. A sudden jerk shook her in her seat. With no longer a companion to distract her. Something terrible had happened. They were a long way further on than when she had lost consciousness. Left to his reflections Abraham soon grew drowsy.

Tess fell more deeply into reverie than ever.

Tess of the D'Urbervilles Summary

Prince also stood firm and motionless as long as he could. The atmosphere turned pale. By this time the mail-cart man had joined her. The pointed shaft of the cart had entered the breast of the unhappy Prince like a sword. Then she stood helplessly looking on. The huge pool of blood in front of her was already assuming the iridescence of coagulation. In her despair Tess sprang forward and put her hand upon the hole.

I'll send somebody to help you as soon as I can. It is getting daylight. Prince lay alongside. What will mother and father live on now? But he was already dead. I danced and laughed only yesterday! But the very shiftlessness of the household rendered the misfortune a less terrifying one to them than it would have been to a thriving family.

A farmer's man from near Stourcastle came up. It was a relief to her tongue to find from the faces of her parents that they already knew of their loss. Prince had lain there in the ditch since the morning. At length a sound. How to break the news was more than she could think. Tess had gone back earlier.

He was harnessed to the waggon of beehives in the place of Prince. In silence they waited through an interval which seemed endless. The evening of the same day saw the empty waggon reach again the spot of the accident. She shook the child. All that was left of Prince was now hoisted into the waggon he had formerly hauled. Hope and Modesty discharged their griefs in loud blares which echoed from the walls.

The bread-winner had been taken away from them. When we d'Urbervilles was knights in the land. Then Durbeyfield began to shovel in the earth. Durbeyfield rose to the occasion. When the hole was ready. Abraham and 'Liza-Lu sobbed.

In the Durbeyfield countenances there was nothing of the red wrath that would have burnt upon the girl from parents more ambitious for her welfare. Durbeyfield and his wife tied a rope round the horse and dragged him up the path towards it. All except Tess. Nobody blamed Tess as she blamed herself. When it was discovered that the knacker and tanner would give only a very few shillings for Prince's carcase because of his decrepitude.

Let 'em keep their shillings! He've served me well in his lifetime. Her face was dry and pale. You must go to her and claim kin. I've heard what I've heard.

Durbeyfield was what was locally called a slack-twisted fellow. But Tess's pride made the part of poor relation one of particular distaste to her. Her mother might have made inquiries. The haggling business. You must try your friends.

Do ye know that there is a very rich Mrs d'Urberville living on the outskirts o' The Chase. She had seen daily from her chamber-window towers.

She had hardly ever visited the place. From the gates and stiles of Marlott she had looked down its length in the wondering days of infancy. But I'll go.

The Vale of Blackmoor was to her the world. I don't mind going and seeing her. Tess Durbeyfield's route on this memorable morning lay amid the northeastern undulations of the Vale in which she had been born. And don't go thinking about her making a match for me—it is silly. Tess the middle one—in a pink print pinafore. Every contour of the surrounding hills was as personal to her as that of her relatives' faces.

Much less had she been far outside the valley. In those early days she had been much loved by others of her own sex and age.

Her mother's intelligence was that of a happy child: Joan Durbeyfield was simply an additional one. Tess became humanely beneficent towards the small ones. As Tess grew older. In this instance it must be admitted that the Durbeyfields were putting their fairest side outward.

Tess thought this was the mansion itself till. The stables. All this sylvan antiquity. It was of recent erection—indeed almost new—and of the same rich red colour that formed such a contrast with the evergreens of the lodge.

Mrs d'Urberville's seat. Everything looked like money—like the last coin issued from the Mint. Every day seemed to throw upon her young shoulders more of the family burdens. She alighted from the van at Trantridge Cross.

It was not a manorial home in the ordinary sense. It was more. The Slopes. The crimson brick lodge came first in sight. Far behind the corner of the house—which rose like a geranium bloom against the subdued colours around—stretched the soft azure landscape of The Chase—a truly venerable tract of forest land.

Everything on this snug property was bright. She wished that she had not fallen in so readily with her mother's plans for "claiming kin.

Parson Tringham had spoken truly when he said that our shambling John Durbeyfield was the only really lineal representative of the old d'Urberville family existing in the county. Yet it must be admitted that this family formed a very good stock whereon to regraft a name which sadly wanted such renovation.

Her feet had brought her onward to this point before she had quite realized where she was. The d'Urbervilles—or Stoke-d'Urbervilles. When old Mr Simon Stoke.

Conning for an hour in the British Museum the pages of works devoted to extinct. Simple Tess Durbeyfield stood at gaze. On the extensive lawn stood an ornamental tent.

Of this work of imagination poor Tess and her parents were naturally in ignorance—much to their discomfiture. It was that of a tall young man. I am Mr d'Urberville. But she screwed herself up to. He had an almost swarthy complexion. And perceiving that she stood quite confounded: Have you come to see me or my mother? Yet he was not an extravagant-minded man in this. Tess still stood hesitating like a bather about to make his plunge.

Despite the touches of barbarism in his contours. She had dreamed of an aged and dignified face. I came. Poor relations? I like foolish things. Try again. What is the business you wish to see her about?

But I did not think it would be like this. I was in the mind to do so myself likewise. And I.

But it is so worn that mother uses it to stir the pea-soup. I'm sure. Antiquarians hold we are. And we have a very old silver spoon.

Where do you live? What are you? Supposing we walk round the grounds to pass the time. He conducted her about. I mean d'Urbervilles. She obeyed like one in a dream. They had spent some time wandering desultorily thus. At last. Tess eating in a halfpleased. When she could consume no more of the strawberries he filled her little basket with them. Come here. She had an attribute which amounted to a disadvantage just now.

My mother must find a berth for you. It was a luxuriance of aspect. She soon had finished her lunch. She had inherited the feature from her mother without the quality it denoted. It had troubled her mind occasionally. Nature does not often say "See! Then he broke into a loud laugh. We may wonder whether at the acme and summit of the human progress these anachronisms will be corrected by a finer intuition.

When d'Urberville got back to the tent he sat down astride on a chair. In the ill-judged execution of the well-judged plan of things the call seldom produces the comer. For a moment—only for a moment—when they were in the turning of the drive. Thus the thing began. Out of which maladroit delay sprang anxieties. Had she perceived this meeting's import she might have asked why she was doomed to be seen and coveted that day by the wrong man.

Enough that in the present case.

I'm damned! What a funny thing! And what a crumby girl! Then she fell to reflecting again. One among her fellow-travellers addressed her more pointedly than any had spoken before: Tess was steeped in fancies and prefigurative superstitions.

Her mother had advised her to stay here for the night. When the passengers were not looking she stealthily removed the more prominent blooms from her hat and placed them in the basket. She blushed. Like all the cottagers in Blackmoor Vale. She did not know what the other occupants said to her as she entered.

The van travelled only so far as Shaston. And such roses in early June! But this is only her artful way of getting 'ee there without raising your hopes. Her mother surveyed the girl up and down with arch approval. She's going to own 'ee as kin—that's the meaning o't. When she entered the house she perceived in a moment from her mother's triumphant manner that something had occurred in the interim.

I know all about it! I told 'ee it would be all right. Jacky—he called her Coz! What has? You've be'n born in the business. Here it is. Her idea had been to get together sufficient money during the summer to download another horse.

They that be born in a business always know more about it than any 'prentice. Will you let me look at it? I don't quite know why. I would go any-when. He is very much interested in 'ee—truth to tell.

Mrs d'Urberville's son had called on horseback. Hardly had she crossed the threshold before one of the children danced across the room. He had wished to know. And have she really paid 'em a visit to such an end as this? He called her Coz! He'll marry her. When she came in her mother pursued her advantage. Then you'll see her soon enough. It is no other kind of chance. She was not quite sure that she did not feel proud enough. And Tess won't look pretty in her best cloze no mo-o-ore!

But—but—I don't quite like Mr d'Urberville being there! I killed the old horse. You had better say nothing of that silly sort about parish. Her father alone preserved an attitude of neutrality. Her mother could not repress her consciousness of the nuptial vision conjured up by the girl's consent.

For such a pretty maid as 'tis. She had hoped to be a teacher at the school. Her mother expostulated. VII On the morning appointed for her departure Tess was awake before dawn —at the marginal minute of the dark when the grove is still mute.

Thus it was arranged. Mrs d'Urberville's handwriting seemed rather masculine.

She was duly informed that Mrs d'Urberville was glad of her decision. Being mentally older than her mother she did not regard Mrs Durbeyfield's matrimonial hopes for her in a serious aspect for a moment. She remained upstairs packing till breakfast-time. The light-minded woman had been discovering good matches for her daughter almost from the year of her birth.

Then she put upon her the white frock that Tess had worn at the club-walking. I suppose you know best. When I was a maid. First she fetched a great basin. And to please her parent the girl put herself quite in Joan's hands. She tied it with a broader pink ribbon than usual. I shall certainly be for making some return to pa'son at Stagfoot Lane for telling us— dear. As the looking-glass was only large enough to reflect a very small portion of Tess's person at one time.

It prompted the matron to say that she would walk a little way—as far as to the point where the acclivity from the valley began its first steep ascent to the outer world. But whatever you do. At the top Tess was going to be met with the spring-cart sent by the Stoke-d'Urbervilles. Seeing their mother put on her bonnet.

After this she went downstairs to her husband. Mrs Durbeyfield hung a black cloak outside the casement. She is such an odd maid that it mid zet her against him. If all goes well. She turned quickly. He'll adorn it better than a poor lammicken feller like myself can.

Nobody was visible in the elevated road which skirted the ascent save the lad whom they had sent on before them. But I won't stand upon trifles—tell'n he shall hae it for fifty—for twenty pound! I'll sell him the title—yes. So the girls and their mother all walked together.

Far away behind the first hills the cliff-like dwellings of Shaston broke the line of the ridge. And tell'n. Tell'n he shall hae it for a hundred. I'll take less. I hope my young friend will like such a comely sample of his own blood. They followed the way till they reached the beginning of the ascent.

Then she looked down. Her seeming indecision was. The young man dismounted. She would have preferred the humble cart. She turned her face down the hill to her relatives. I see it yonder! Her mother perceived. But before she had quite reached it another vehicle shot out from a clump of trees on the summit. Mrs Durbeyfield clapped her hands like a child. Her mother and the children thereupon decided to go no farther. Tess bent her steps up the hill.

Meanwhile the muslined form of Tess could be seen standing still. The driver was a young man of three. They saw her white shape draw near to the spring-cart. Could she be deceived as to the meaning of this? Something seemed to quicken her to a determination. There were tears also in Joan Durbeyfield's eyes as she turned to go home.

Her d'Urberville blood.

Tess of the d’Urbervilles

Joan Durbeyfield always managed to find consolation somewhere: But by the time she had got back to the village she was passively trusting to the favour of accident. I don't know exactly. She suddenly stepped up. Directly Tess was out of sight.

I wouldn't let her go till I had found out whether the gentleman is really a good-hearted young man and choice over her as his kinswoman. The youngest child said. The new point of view was infectious. For that he's all afire wi' love for her any eye can see. And if he don't marry her afore he will after. In a moment they had passed the slow cart with the box. D'Urberville looked round upon her. Thus they reached the verge of an incline down which the road stretched in a long straight descent of nearly a mile.

I always go down at full gallop. It is not. She began to get uneasy at a certain recklessness in her conductor's driving. Alec d'Urberville drove rapidly along the crest of the first hill. Ever since the accident with her father's horse Tess Durbeyfield. Rising still. There's nothing like it for raising your spirits. If any living man can manage this horse I can: I won't say any living man can do it—but if such has the power.

Tib has to be considered. And then. The aspect of the straight road enlarged with their advance. But she's touchy still. I fancy she looked round at me in a very grim way just then. Didn't you notice it? I suppose. Sometimes a wheel was off the ground. I don't. I am he. I nearly killed her. Tib has killed one chap. It was my fate. We shall be thrown out if you do! Hold on round my waist!

Recovering her reserve. She was determined to show no open fear. He loosened rein. D'Urberville turned his face to her as they rocked. The wind blew through Tess's white muslin to her very skin. But I— thought you would be kind to me. I will! I don't know—very well.It was not a manorial home in the ordinary sense. I mean. I don't see why two branches o' one family should not be on visiting terms. She had hoped to be a teacher at the school. She had earlier written Angel a psalm-like letter, full of love, self-abasement, and pleas for mercy, in which she begs him to help her fight the temptation she is facing.

There's a very pretty brew in tap at The Pure Drop— though. In silence they waited through an interval which seemed endless. Don't you really know, Durbeyfield, that you are the lineal representative of the ancient and knightly family of the d'Urbervilles, who derive their descent from Sir Pagan d'Urberville, that renowned knight who came from Normandy with William the Conqueror, as appears by Battle Abbey Roll?

He tells his parents about Tess, and they agree to meet her.

SHEILAH from Henderson
Feel free to read my other posts. I'm keen on land windsurfing. I do relish reading novels always .
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